Category Archives: Health behaviors

The Intersection of Religion, Female Empowerment, and Access to Reproductive Healthcare

Reproductive rights have been a topic for policy making and legal jurisprudence throughout much of the past century. As the healthcare system of the United States continues to evolve, women’s health and reproductive rights remain central to the debate. A recent policy update by Aishwarya Rajagopalan and Lisa Lines here at The Medical Care Blog discusses… Read More »

How Accurate is Your Activity Tracker?

The functionality and popularity of consumer-grade activity trackers (such as Fitbit) appear to be ever-increasing.  If you don’t personally own one, you probably know at least one or two people who do.  In an online survey of 1,000 respondents [PDF], conducted in 2016 by PwC, 45% owned a fitness band, with “Health” being the primary… Read More »

Smoking cessation treatment among newly covered individuals under the ACA

Smoking cessation is not innovative or trendy or even particularly exciting, but as a primary care doctor, in most cases helping a patient quit smoking is the best thing that I can do to help that patient over their lifetime. Without question. And for that reason, I always make it a priority to talk about it… Read More »

Intimate Partner Violence: The Under-Addressed Pandemic

Violence against women and girls is an international concern that cuts across all sectors of society. The United Nations defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary… Read More »

The childhood roots of health inequity: Part 3 – Dr. Kerith Conron

This post is the third in our series focusing on presentations that were delivered at a special panel session at APHA16 on the childhood roots of health inequity [part 1, part 2]. Our third presenter, Kerith Conron, ScD, MPH, is currently the Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director at The Williams Institute of UCLA’s School… Read More »

Discrimination in Trans Healthcare and the Call for Further Provider Education

Adequacy of healthcare for transgender patients has recently come to light, particularly with the increased discussion of trans persons in the media. Trans individuals identify their gender differently from their assigned sex at birth. Trans healthcare is an emerging field of research, and this increased focus continues to uncover the lack of knowledge amongst providers… Read More »

The childhood roots of health inequity: Part 1 – Dr. Paula Braveman

Children who grow up in stressful environments, without adequate adult support, are at much greater risk of developing heart disease, cancer, and many other diseases as adults. This is partly because of the coping behaviors that people use to deal with stress, but also because of the cumulative effects of toxic stress. Thus, many of… Read More »

The Person-Centered Wellness Home: Reflections on a Conversation with Dr. Thelma Mielenz

With the mania of the presidential election in full tilt and the election just days away, it’s hard to have a rational public discussion about health care.  Supporters of the two presidential candidates have drawn a deep and divisive line (or rather a tectonic fissure) in the sand about health care reform.  This is due, in great part, to the bombastic, and ultimately… Read More »

Economic Burden of the Opioid Epidemic

According to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, in 2014, more than 240 million prescriptions were written for opioids, which is more than sufficient for each American adult to have one full bottle of opioids. Prescription drugs are second only to marijuana as the most abused category of drug in the United States. A recent article… Read More »

Seeking Clarity on Opioid Prescribing

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), more than 18,000 people died from overdoses of prescription opioids in 2014. This is more than the number of overdose deaths attributed to heroin (10,854) and cocaine (5,415) combined. Opioids are pain relievers that are chemically similar to morphine. Existing clinical guidelines recommend against exceeding a threshold… Read More »