Category Archives: Public health

The Intersection of Religion, Female Empowerment, and Access to Reproductive Healthcare

Reproductive rights have been a topic for policy making and legal jurisprudence throughout much of the past century. As the healthcare system of the United States continues to evolve, women’s health and reproductive rights remain central to the debate. A recent policy update by Aishwarya Rajagopalan and Lisa Lines here at The Medical Care Blog discusses… Read More »

Patterns of Buprenorphine-Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder

Despite a rapid expansion in the use of buprenorphine-naloxone (bup-nx) as a treatment for opioid use disorder, there is little understanding of the patterns of treatment. In a newly published-ahead-of-print Medical Care article, Brendan Saloner and colleagues from Johns Hopkins used an all-payer claims database to investigate what factors predict the duration of treatment, dosage, and continuity of treatment for… Read More »

Smoking cessation treatment among newly covered individuals under the ACA

Smoking cessation is not innovative or trendy or even particularly exciting, but as a primary care doctor, in most cases helping a patient quit smoking is the best thing that I can do to help that patient over their lifetime. Without question. And for that reason, I always make it a priority to talk about it… Read More »

Avoiding Anticholinergic Drugs May Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk

I’ll never forget the time Granddaddy tried to eat my hand. At least that’s how it seemed to me at age six. In reality, he’d simply confused my hand with the straw sticking out of the milkshake we’d brought to him at the nursing home. By that point in his early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, the Granddaddy… Read More »

Intimate Partner Violence: The Under-Addressed Pandemic

Violence against women and girls is an international concern that cuts across all sectors of society. The United Nations defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary… Read More »

The Political Context of Medicaid Expansion

Republican Congressional leaders are currently debating how to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as part of the budget reconciliation process. Much of the debate over the ACA has focused on the individual mandate (and here) and the affordability (here and here) of coverage in the state-based marketplaces. The House version of the legislation, however,… Read More »

The childhood roots of health inequity: Part 3 – Dr. Kerith Conron

This post is the third in our series focusing on presentations that were delivered at a special panel session at APHA16 on the childhood roots of health inequity [part 1, part 2]. Our third presenter, Kerith Conron, ScD, MPH, is currently the Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director at The Williams Institute of UCLA’s School… Read More »

Discrimination in Trans Healthcare and the Call for Further Provider Education

Adequacy of healthcare for transgender patients has recently come to light, particularly with the increased discussion of trans persons in the media. Trans individuals identify their gender differently from their assigned sex at birth. Trans healthcare is an emerging field of research, and this increased focus continues to uncover the lack of knowledge amongst providers… Read More »

Burnout among physicians and nurses

Private practitioners are busy people between caring for their patients, recording and documenting data, going to meetings, keeping up with new treatment modalities, and running a practice group. They follow a tight schedule, have multiple sources of pressure, and suffer from burnout. Stress occurs when a person is drained of energy, but can recover. In the case of… Read More »

The childhood roots of health inequity: Part 1 – Dr. Paula Braveman

Children who grow up in stressful environments, without adequate adult support, are at much greater risk of developing heart disease, cancer, and many other diseases as adults. This is partly because of the coping behaviors that people use to deal with stress, but also because of the cumulative effects of toxic stress. Thus, many of… Read More »

APHA 2016 – One Student’s Experience

Posters and banners declaring “Creating the Healthiest Nation: Ensuring the Right to Health” were hung throughout the Colorado Convention Center in downtown Denver last month, celebrating the theme of the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) 144th Annual Meeting and Expo.  As a first time attendee, one of approximately 11,600 people, I was a bit overwhelmed;… Read More »

The Person-Centered Wellness Home: Reflections on a Conversation with Dr. Thelma Mielenz

With the mania of the presidential election in full tilt and the election just days away, it’s hard to have a rational public discussion about health care.  Supporters of the two presidential candidates have drawn a deep and divisive line (or rather a tectonic fissure) in the sand about health care reform.  This is due, in great part, to the bombastic, and ultimately… Read More »

Who Treats Medicaid Patients?

Who treats Medicaid patients? And is the quality of care provided by these individuals the same as you might expect from a clinician who takes only private insurance? An article in the April 2016 issue of Medical Care sought to answer these questions.

Although more than 92% of physicians reported seeing at least one Medicaid patient in 2011, the median proportion of Medicaid patients, for both PCPs and specialists, was less than 6%. This suggests that a small group of providers is responsible for seeing the majority of patients with Medicaid coverage…

As a current medical student, this research struck a nerve, particularly because of the emphasis on IMGs and medical school ranking. … What is more important to me is to understand what I, as a future primary care provider, can do. How do I ensure that people with Medicaid coverage get timely and appropriate referrals to specialty care? How can I expand my provider network to better equip them with the tools they need to ensure their long-term, lasting health?

How Primary Care Might Fare Under The Plans of the Two Leading Republican Presidential Contenders

The presidential primaries are in full swing and health care is an issue for both parties. The candidates have left themselves plenty of wiggle room, but there is enough information in the public domain to make some predictions about what the different approaches (and they are different) would mean for the health care system. This… Read More »

Smoke-free Public Housing: A Rule Whose Time Has Come

Earlier this month, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) released a proposed federal rule to implement smoke-free public housing. The proposed rule would affect all living units, common areas, outdoor areas up to 25 feet away from the housing areas, and administrative offices. The change would affect over 700,000 units no later than… Read More »